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20110704
20110704
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problems. dr. jon lapook examine it is study and what it means. mandy clark one on one with the top u.s. commander in afghanistan on the future of the war and the decision to begin pulling out. the man accused of the worst war crimes in europe since the natsys shows nothing but contempt for justice. mark phillips has the pictures from the court. and on this fourth of july as the space shuttle program nears an end, jim axelrod asks "what happened to the flags on the moon?" >> it's beautiful. >> pelley: do those star spangled banners yet wave? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, chantix is the most popular anti-smoking drug on the market with annual sales of nearly $800 million. but a study out today raises new safety questions about it. chantix has already been linked to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who
to an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and now to a higher risk of heart disease we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us what we need to know about these new findings. >> reporter: today's study is worrisome news for the more than seven million americans who have taken chantix. a new analysis links the pill to a 72% increase in the risk of heart problems. johns hopkins dr. sonal singh led the research. >> it is causing the same problems we are trying to prevent, that's why it's not worth the risk. we need to prevent cardiac disease among smokers, not increase it. >> reporter: the review involves more than 8,000 patients. while a 72% increased risk sounds alarming, a companion editorial entitled "is it a heart breaker?" notice that heart problems are still rare, occurring in only about 1% of patients taking chantix. the drug maker pfizer questions the way the analysis was conducted. dr. gail walk well is vice president of medical affairs for pfizer. >> we will continue to do a more in-depth look as the f.d.a. is asking us to do. to date we have not seen evidence of important risks to the heart
her fate. i'm jon scott in for shepard smith. "the fox report" starts now. >> members of the jury, you may retire now to begin your deliberations. >> after weeks of battling, the lawyers got in their parting shots. >> there is nothing that is wrong with casey anthony that can't be explained using two words -- pathological liar. >> if you find casey anthony not guilty, they have not proved her guilt. >> now, it is for the jurors to decide. casey's fate is in their hands and her future is in the air. tonight, a potential life for death decision for the woman accused of murder. >>> plus, restoring a flag that flew at ground zero. >> we are going to have some where between 20,000, maybe 30,000 stitchs. >> and fixing this flag may be healing some hearts. >> it meant so much to me as a needleworker, as a mother of an american soldier who willingly volunteered his service and lost his life doing so. >> tonight on the rise of freedom, the true fabric of america. but first, from fox, on this fourth of july, the jury in the casey anthony trial spent nearly six hours considering her fate on their
, the seeming front runner. jon huntsman has made it clear that he will not compete in iowa. he could be a formidable challenger. the question is will that steepen the victory for the people that come out of that state doing well or not? what inevitably happens in iowa is the person who comes out of that race comes out with a lot of momentum. what is important is not just the perception among voters, but the perception among donors. so what you will see is people cashing in on those victories. i think iowa is an important state no matter to compete staircase. how important it will be remains to be seen. host: kathy kiely is the politics managing editor. the numbers to call -- a story in "to "the huffington post" recently -- how does that play out in terms of candidates figuring out their strategy and carrying their message? guest: it plays out because this is one of the controversial aspects of our election system. we use an electoral college system which makes certain states very important, states where the candidates know the battle will be closely fought. other states become flight
and morality are essential to the good of massachusetts. this last until 1833. i think jon and i are arguing the flipside of, arguing the opposite side of the coin but i don't think we are in disagreement at all. >> we have time for one more question. in the back in the red sweater. >> i'm curious to your answer, we have members of the supreme court today that feel they should rule their decisions on what the people were thinking at the time of the constitution being written. now, where'd you come down on something like that? [applause] >> you give me a pointer to the supreme court, i'd be happy to set them straight. [laughter] look, the question of original intent is one that historians by and large reject. i'm also a lawyer so i don't rejected quite as quickly as historians do. what the supreme court has said again and again, this is interesting, important and interesting, the one provision of the constitution that should be bounded by its history is the first amendment. you see that over and over again in the supreme court cases. so even the members of the court to reject the notion of or
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5